Thursday, March 06, 2008

 

CBC Idea How to think about science industrial fishing


Satellite photo of bottom dragger's

Before and after photo of bottom being dragged.

Very very informative documentary on industrial fishing and the science of setting quotas.

http://podcast.cbc.ca/mp3/thinkaboutscience_20080306_4919.mp3

The one thing that I took away from this show other than the sheer idiocy of DFO's science and management of the worlds greatest food source is that we are going about fishing all the wrong way.

Specifically with regard to bottom dragger's. Besides the destructive nature and in discriminant nature of the harvest is that most of our fishing practices are geared towards keeping the largest fish. When in fact it should be more of a targeted process geared towards harvesting only the sustainable sized fish.

I think there are certain methods that do target this size fish like gil nets and maybe pots but I'm not all that certain about pots other than the fact that the fish caught in pots are alive and can be selected when harvested to throw back the preferred sizes.

Now for the real culprit the dragger's they are designed to only allow the smaller fish the escape but anything larger than the size of the mesh is captured. That includes the larges and best chance of recovery.

So here is my thought how about instead of having just an open front to the dragger net put a selections screen across the front to only allow into the net those that are of a sufficiently small size and leave the largest fish to spawn and renew the stocks.

I should also think that the net should be buoyed in such a way that it doesn't drag the bottom once it is full. Now some will argue that fish are buoyant and when the fish are in the net it doesn't drag on the bottom but rather floats. Sorry but fish compressed into the back of a net and for all intensive purposes dead don't have any buoyancy.

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